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  ELECTED OFFICIALS  

Meet our local representatives and learn how they help our neighborhood

the unna boundaries include territory supported by more than one WARD, councilmatic district and state representative.

CINDY BASS

DISTRICT 8 COUNCILWOMAN

CLICK HERE TO CONTACT

DWAYNE LILLEY

11TH WARD LEADER

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DARRELL L. CLARKE

DISTRICT 5 COUNCILMAN/ CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT 

CLICK HERE TO CONTACT

EL AMOR M. BRAWNE ALI

37th Ward Leader

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SENATOR SHARIF STREET

3RD SENATORIAL DISTRICT

CONTACT SENATOR STREET'S OFFICE CLICK HERE

DANILO BURGOS

PA STATE REPRESENTATIVE

DISTRICT 197

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MALCOLM KENYATTA

PA STATE REPRESENTATIVE

DISTRICT 181

CLICK HERE TO CONTACT

ROSITA YOUNGBLOOD

PA STATE REPRESENTATIVE

DISTRICT 198

CLICK HERE TO CONTACT

Black Puzzle Pieces

LINKS AND INFORMATION ON PHILADELPHIA CITY COUNCIL, STATE GOVERNMENT, 

THE LEGISLATION PROCESS AND HOW THE COMMUNITY IS INVOLVED !!

The functions of City Council influence a wide range of public affairs in Philadelphia and directly impact the quality of life for its citizens.

As a whole, City Council drafts, debates, and enacts legislation that adds to or amends the body of law governing the city of Philadelphia, known as the City Code. These local laws, called “ordinances,” work in conjunction with state and federal law and with the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter to govern the everyday lives of Philadelphia residents and taxpayers.

 

Proposals brought before City Council to create new laws and amend old ones are called "bills." However, much of the work that is required to transform a bill into law happens long before a bill is introduced in City Council. Council members may spend months - sometimes years - drafting proposals, meeting with constituents (us, the community) and other interested parties, and making alliances with other Council members to gather support.

 

The actual legislative process – which means the steps that must take place between the time a bill is introduced in Council and when it actually becomes part of the City Code – is often more difficult than it sounds. It requires approval by City Council and action by the mayor.

 

The process for adding provisions to, or amending, the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter requires an additional step: approval by the voters (us, again). Proposed Charter additions or amendments are submitted in the form of ballot questions at a primary or general election. If approved by a majority of the voters who cast their vote on a specific ballot question, the addition or amendment becomes a permanent part of the Home Rule Charter

 

For more information and specific details on the functions of the process, visit the links below to key resources available from the City of Philadelphia and The Committee of Seventy.   

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CLICK HERE to view the "How city council works" PDF/slideshow

City Council meets every Thursday at 10am

City Hall room 400

CLICK HEREto view City Council’s calendar online for the next session.

The Pennsylvania House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the Pennsylvania General Assembly. Alongside the Pennsylvania State Senate, it forms the legislative branch of the Pennsylvania state government and works alongside the governor of Pennsylvania to create laws and establish a state budget. Legislative authority and responsibilities of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives include passing bills on public policy matters, setting levels for state spending, raising and lowering taxes, and voting to uphold or override gubernatorial vetoes.

 

Every state legislature and state legislative chamber in the country contains several legislative committees. These committees are responsible for studying, amending, and voting on legislation before it reaches the floor of a chamber for a full vote. The different types of committees include standing committees, select or special, and joint.  Standing committees are permanent committees and the names sometimes change from session to session.  Select or special are temporary committees formed to deal with specific issues such as recent legislation, major public policy or proposals, or investigations.  Joint are committees that feature members of both chambers of a legislature.  The Pennsylvania House of Representatives has approximately 27 standing committees.

 

The Pennsylvania House of Representatives meets in the state capitol building in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

CLICK A BUTTON/ LINK BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION